How Long Do Airbags Last?

Whether you’re a driver of a sports car, sedan, truck or a big rig, airbags are an essential part of your safety, regardless of whether you think about them daily or not. They have been around for many years. One of the vital safety features that have prevented countless injuries and saved many lives is the airbag. But, while airbags can prevent injuries they also can pose a serious threat when they are faulty.

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How to Report a Drunk Driver

Drunk driving can be deadly! Many people struggle to either know when they’ve had one too many to get behind the wheel, or to do something to stop others in these circumstances. It’s evident that driving drunk is against the law, yet people still do it on a regular basis. The extent and consequences of drunk driving demonstrate the challenge of harmonizing a drinking culture with a modern industrial society.

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Awareness and Prevention of Distracted Driving

DISTRACTED DRIVING

Cаr ассidеntѕ are one оf thе leading саuѕеѕ of dеаth in our country, injuring thоuѕаndѕ оf adults and сhildrеn еvеrу уеаr. Anуоnе саn bесоmе a viсtim of a саr ассidеnt; often it’s even just a case of being in the wrоng place at thе wrоng time.

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OnStar Smart Driver – Buick’s Driving Improvement System

As part of General Motors’ OnStar Basic Plan, owners of 2015 and newer Buicks can opt-in for the OnStar Smart Driver system. OnStar Smart Driver is designed to gather, analyze and display driving-related information. Read more

Protecting Our Children: Avoiding Accidents When Backing Up

We may not hear about it every day, but it’s astounding just how prevalent this type of accident is. In the U.S. alone, at least 50 children a week are victims of backover incidents, with approximately 48 requiring emergency room treatment for their injuries and two suffering fatal injuries.  These accidents result in about 13,000 injuries and more than 200 fatalities a year.

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DUI Laws in Arizona

So you’ve had one drink. That can’t hurt right? Wrong. In Arizona, that one drink could land you in jail. If you aren’t familiar with Arizona’s Zero Tolerance DUI law, then read on to learn more.

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Driving Scams Everyone Should Be Aware Of

Today’s technology has provided seemingly countless advantages for individuals looking to enhance their own lives and increase their work efficiency. On the flip side, however, some of those same technological advances have opened doors for scammers , hackers, and the like.

When it comes to the world of driving, road travel, and car sales, many would hope that the auto industry would be safe from scams. Unfortunately, from getting cheated on taxi rides to uncovering Mastercard data, driving scams exists all over the world. 

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The Specific Areas of Your Car of which You Need to Be Most Aware

How well do you know your car? The possibility of getting into a car accident can be a scary thought looming over the joys of owning and driving a car. However, did you know that taking simple precautions with your vehicle can go a long way in helping you avoid those accidents?

Being aware of the specific areas of your car that can not only warn you of an impending problem allows you to nip it in the bud and also saves you in case of an accident.

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Car Safety: Comparing the Old With the New

It has been an epic battle for advocates of car safety features over a greater part of the past one hundred years. But the car industry has finally reacted to the growing consumer demand and regulatory pressure with various safety inventions and innovations.

In an attempt to produce cars with better safety features, America has begun a long, complex journey that has recorded quite a number of detours and accidents along the way.

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SB1080 Making Major Changes on Arizona Roads

It looks like Arizona roads are about to become a lot safer, thanks to Senate Bill 1080. On April 20, the Arizona state House gave final approval to legislation banning teens with a learner’s driving permit from texting or making calls from their cell phones behind the wheel. Passing with a 32-24 margin, SB1080 also extends that restriction to the first six months the driver has their actual Class G license, which is reserved for new drivers.

This bill was first introduced to the state senate on January 17, 2017, and just earlier this month, many had doubts that the bill would pass. Rep. Phil Lovas, R-Peoria, who chairs the House Rules Committee, expressed on April 6 that he would refuse to give a hearing to the Senate-passed bill. The Senate had previously approved the bill on a 24-6 margin.

While Lovas claimed that he personally was for the bill, he heard enough concerns from other members to take a bold stance. According to Lovas, once Arizona enacts its first-ever restrictions, no matter how minimal, it potentially becomes easier to expand the law so that more people, not just new drivers, are barred from driving while texting.

This type of thinking is how the term “nanny state” was coined. This describes a situation where the state begins telling people what’s best for them. Those arguments have proven successful in the past, even resulting in lawmakers voting in 1976 to repeal laws requiring motorcyclists to wear helmets.

As it currently stands, Arizona and Montana are the only two states that do not have any restrictions on cell phone use behind the wheel of a vehicle. In fact, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), 14 states, D.C., Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands prohibit all drivers from using hand-held cell phones while driving. 37 states and D.C. ban all cell phone use by novice or teen drivers, and 46 states, D.C., Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands ban text messaging for all drivers.

Unlike laws in other states, SB1080 would make cell phone use and driving for new drivers a secondary offense, meaning the driver could only be issued a ticket for it if they had been pulled over for some other reason, such as speeding.

Despite his threat to squash the bill before it reached the state house floor, it was indeed presented and passed, thanks in a large part to Rep. Karen Fann, R-Prescott, who shepherded SB1080 through the Senate. She expressed that the Rules Committee, unlike other panels, is not supposed to debate the policy merits of a measure. Instead, the only issue for that committee to decide is whether a measure is constitutional and in proper form for consideration by the full House, and SB1080 was approved in both areas.

Now, the bill just needs one remaining signature to become law—Governor Doug Ducey’s. Ducey, who has three sons, two of whom are of driving age, finds this to be a personal bill to him.

That, partnered with the sad statistic that 11 teens die nationally every day while texting and driving, pushes many to believe that Ducey will sign the bill without any hesitation.

While a AAA study found that 94 percent of teen drivers recognize the danger of texting and driving, 35 percent admit to doing it anyways. This gives merit to the importance of the bill and getting it passed.

Ducey is expected to make a decision shortly, so be sure to follow the story for more updates in the coming days.